Healthy Living

Physiotherapist tales

This post is brought to you by Chandler MacLeod

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Some months ago, I had to bite the bullet and visit a physiotherapist for my knee problems. The problems began back in 2013 when I started hiking a lot. It was particularly during descents that my knees would eventually hurt. Really, really, badly. Then when I ran at the gym, I couldn’t run for more than one or two kilometres without a stabbing pain in my knees. Most of the time it was my right knee but the left one would play up too at times.

People suggested seeing a podiatrist and getting orthotics in my shoes because I tended to roll my feet in while walking and running. So I did. And paid a bomb for orthotics. But unfortunately, the pain continued. That’s when I decided I had to do something I probably should have done before.

I went to see a physiotherapist.

I chose to see a sports physiotherapist because of the activities I engage in. Although technically, I have never had a knee injury, it was essential that I see someone who could assist me keeping my exercise routine and hiking in mind. There are other physiotherapists specialising in aged care, community care and rehab but I guess I’d probably only need the last one currently if I had some kind of injury. I was fortunate to find a sports physiotherapist close to home who worked with footy teams. They obviously knew their stuff.

I still remember on the first visit he got me to walk and to do one-legged squats {yeah, that was hard!} and in the end explained the mechanics behind my knee pain which had to do with the way I walked, the structure of my joints and bones as well as the not-so-strong muscles around my knees and tight muscles on my glutes and hamstrings.

Seeing a physiotherapist also showed me how health professionals other than doctors and psychologists work. For one thing, they were able to see more than one patient at a time. I was taught some exercises for my knees and made to practise the same while they then went and taught another client. They’d check on their patients separately. And oh, the best bit? The massage! In order to loosen my tight muscles, I got a massage. Within a few sessions and continuing to do the exercises at home, things improved with my knees. The last time I went hiking in June {an overnight one}, I didn’t experience significant knee problems and that to me was a huge relief! This coming weekend will be another test.

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I personally found physiotherapy to be more effective in terms of the pain as well as in terms of the cost. Due to my private health cover, it was way more cost-effective than a podiatrist. As long as I take responsibility and practice the knee exercises, it is beneficial. And it was all over the span of a month. I can run for about two kilometres now and can hike without too much difficulty.

I guess I know where to go the next time I have some problems with joints or muscles. And let’s face it — on this side of 30, my body is probably going to need it!

Have you had to see a physiotherapist? 

Do share your story!

Until next time,

Cheers!!!

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  • Amrita
    3 October 2014 at 6:40 pm

    I hope you recover and are pain free very soon! This post hit home hard since I’ve been in and out of physio sessions for knees and the neck for the last decade or so!
    Since I’m a regular at the gym I made the stupid mistake of thinking that hiking would be fine. The descent really killed my knees and after two hikes I had a take a month off and start physio.

  • Amrita
    3 October 2014 at 6:40 pm

    I hope you recover and are pain free very soon! This post hit home hard since I’ve been in and out of physio sessions for knees and the neck for the last decade or so!
    Since I’m a regular at the gym I made the stupid mistake of thinking that hiking would be fine. The descent really killed my knees and after two hikes I had a take a month off and start physio.